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Teens Prefer Prescription Stimulants to Get High, Stay Awake, and Lose Weight

Posted on December 13, 2010 in Stimulants

Teens will often go to great lengths to escape their current environment, both physically and mentally. One substance that is often introduced to assist in the mental escape is stimulant drugs. A new KOTATV report shows that these drugs, which are often prescribed legally, tend to be abused by teens.

Stimulants are usually obtained through legitimate means, including prescriptions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The drugs prescribed for this condition often include Adderall (amphetamine-dextroamphetamine) and Ritalin (methylphenidate).

While these medications can help ADHD patients feel calmer and more focused, they also help to deliver an intoxicating high. This high is generally what drives teens to not only try, but eventually abuse the medications.

Part of the risk associated with stimulant use and abuse is the fact that teens do not view them as harmful as illegal drugs. Since stimulants are prescribed by a physician, they are considered safe for consumption by anyone. This assumption is often what puts the teen at risk.

Research into this area shows that high school seniors tend to favor amphetamines. In fact, this medication is the third most commonly used drug among this group. Some prefer the medication to stay awake, others may use it to lose weight, and still others simply seek the associated high.

The health risks associated with this use are significant. Stimulant drugs increase blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature and breathing. Users will find it harder to sleep and less hungry.

When abused, the drugs can lead to malnutrition, fever and headaches, heart attack, stroke, anxiety, hostility, seizures, tremors and more. Once addiction sets in, withdrawal should only be done under a doctor’s care to protect the health and well-being of the teen.
 

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