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Prescription Drug Addiction

The Truth About Lyrica Abuse and Addiction

Posted on July 17, 2015 in Prescription Drug Addiction

The Truth About Lyrica Abuse and AddictionLyrica, the brand-name drug for the generic pregabalin, is a type of pain medication that some people abuse. Lyrica drug abuse is serious. Abusing any drug, whether it is illegal or a prescription, can lead to addiction. There are other prescription painkillers, namely narcotics, that are more addictive and more susceptible to abuse, but to ignore the addictive potential of Lyrica is to make a dangerous mistake. If you are prescribed Lyrica, know the risks and dangers of abusing it and be careful to only take it as directed by your doctor.

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Why You Should Never Combine Demerol and Lomotil

Posted on June 10, 2015 in Prescription Drug Addiction

Why You Should Never Combine Demerol and LomotilAbusing any prescription drug is dangerous, risky and bad for your health, but you crank up the danger even more when you combine drugs. The Lomotil-Demerol connection is a common but harmful one. If you abuse either of these drugs separately, you put yourself in danger. If you abuse them together, you increase the risk of adverse health effects even more. Educate yourself about these medications and find out why you should respect them and never abuse them.

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Buprenorphine Tapering Less Effective for Prescription Opioid Addiction

Posted on May 28, 2015 in Prescription Drug Addiction

Buprenorphine Tapering Less Effective for Prescription Opioid AddictionPrescription drug abuse is a huge problem in the U.S., and determining the most effective ways to help people struggling with it is an understandable priority for public health. Many physicians opt for a “tapering” approach to detoxification, where an alternative opioid like buprenorphine or methadone is prescribed in a gradually-decreasing dosage. The theory is that this will enable those addicted to drugs like OxyContin to reduce their dependence while also minimizing withdrawal symptoms, but a new study has indicted that tapering using buprenorphine doesn’t work as effectively as simple maintenance using the same drug.

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How Prozac Can Be Harmful

Posted on April 8, 2015 in Prescription Drug Addiction

Prozac, which is a brand name for the generic antidepressant fluoxetine, helps many people struggling with clinical depression, but it can also be a risky drug to take. Prozac abuse is common, although experts don’t consider the drug to be habit-forming. There is always the possibility of becoming dependent on a drug of abuse, and there is also the risk of dangerous side effects. If you have been prescribed Prozac or another brand of fluoxetine, know the risks and take the medication responsibly.  Is Prozac a Controlled Substance? One of the biggest concerns anyone should have when taking a prescription medication is whether it is a drug that is susceptible to abuse. Any drug that makes you feel good is one that you might abuse. If Prozac makes you feel relaxed and stifles your depressive symptoms, for instance, you might feel tempted to take more than the recommended dose. Or, once your doctor says you can stop taking it, you might ignore that and continue because of how the drug makes you feel. The Drug Enforcement Administration does not list fluoxetine as a controlled substance, which means it is not considered to be habit forming. However, it is a drug that some people feel compelled to abuse.  Is Fluoxetine Addictive? Experts would say that Prozac is not addictive, or in other words not habit-forming, which is why it is not listed as a controlled substance. However, you should be aware that whenever you abuse a drug, you put yourself at risk of becoming psychologically dependent on it. With Prozac you might feel as if you need it in order to feel relaxed or to sleep restfully at night. You may also feel afraid that if you stop taking it you will return to a depressed state. Your hesitation might lead you to feel that you absolutely need the drug.   Side Effects of Prozac Prozac addiction may be uncommon, but abuse of this drug is not. Abusing it means increasing the risk of experiencing side effects. It can also mean that the side effects you experience will be more severe. Possible side effects of Prozac include drowsiness, excessive sweating, dry mouth, sore throat, loss of appetite, weight loss, nervousness, nausea and loss of sex drive. The rare but more serious side effects include trouble breathing, a rash and hives, joint pain and swelling, confusion, fever, hallucinations and seizures.   You may also experience withdrawal from Prozac if you abuse it and then stop using the drug. The official name for this condition is called antidepressant discontinuation syndrome and it can be serious. Symptoms include anxiety, irritability, headaches, fatigue, flu-like symptoms and depression. If you are worried about withdrawal or think you have been abusing Prozac, talk to your doctor before you stop using the drug. You will need guidance to slowly stop using it to avoid the syndrome. Abusing any drug is risky, so know the facts before you make that choice. Prozac, which is a brand name for the generic antidepressant fluoxetine, helps many people struggling with clinical depression, but it can also be a risky drug to take. Prozac abuse is common, although experts don’t consider the drug to be habit-forming. There is always the possibility of becoming dependent on a drug of abuse, and there is also the risk of dangerous side effects. If you have been prescribed Prozac or another brand of fluoxetine, know the risks and take the medication responsibly.

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Suboxone Abuse Is a Growing Problem

Posted on February 19, 2015 in Prescription Drug Addiction

Suboxone Abuse Is a Growing ProblemSuboxone is one of several drugs used in medication-assisted treatment programs to help people with opioid addictions get sober. The drug is comprised of the opioid buprenorphine and the anti-overdose drug naloxone. And while studies have found Suboxone to be highly effective at helping people recover from drug abuse, there are a growing number of cases in which Suboxone itself has become the subject of a new addiction.

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Why You Should Never Abuse Propofol

Posted on January 30, 2015 in Prescription Drug Addiction

Why You Should Never Abuse PropofolAlso known as ‘milk of amnesia,’ Propofol is an anesthesia that is very risky to take without the guidance of a doctor. In fact, sometimes even when taken with a doctor’s supervision, this drug can kill. That was the case with Michael Jackson, who died from taking more of this sedative anesthesia than he should have. Propofol euphoria is a dangerous high to chase, and if prescribed this medication you should be very careful that you aren’t tempted to misuse it. 

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Is Buprenorphine Abuse Increasing?

Posted on January 2, 2015 in Prescription Drug Addiction

Is Buprenorphine Abuse Increasing?Buprenorphine is the generic name of a sublingual (under-the-tongue) medication that doctors in the U.S. can prescribe for people receiving treatment for an opioid addiction. Since this medication is also an opioid substance, it can potentially function as a target of substance abuse. In a study published in 2014 in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, researchers from two American universities used a large-scale project to help determine if the rate of buprenorphine abuse is increasing. These researchers also investigated the reasons any given individual would choose the medication as an abuse target.

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Which Forms of Buprenorphine Are Most Commonly Abused?

Posted on December 3, 2014 in Prescription Drug Addiction

Which Forms of Buprenorphine Are Most Commonly Abused?Buprenorphine is an opioid medication designed to help prevent severe withdrawal symptoms in people affected by opioid dependence or addiction. The medication comes in three main forms. Although buprenorphine is substantially weaker than the average target of opioid abuse, some people still intentionally misuse it. In a study published in July 2014 in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, researchers from five U.S. institutions conducted a large-scale analysis in order to determine which forms of the medication are most likely to serve as sources of opioid abuse

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As Prescription Opioid Deaths Dip, Heroin Deaths Double

Posted on November 14, 2014 in Prescription Drug Addiction

As Prescription Opioid Deaths Dip, Heroin Deaths Double Prescription pain relievers are killing fewer people, but heroin deaths are more than making up for it. In fact, heroin deaths doubled from 2010-12, according to a study recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The investigation was spurred by national death rates over 12 years ending in 2010 that saw prescription opioid pain reliever (OPR) overdoses quadruple while heroin overdoses increased by less than 50 percent.

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Are You Abusing Flexeril?

Posted on October 15, 2014 in Prescription Drug Addiction

Are You Abusing Flexeril?Flexeril is a brand name for the generic medication cyclobenzaprine. It has been approved as a prescription for pain relief and as a muscle relaxant. Flexeril is only intended to be used for a short duration. If you use it for a longer period of time than your doctor recommended, take a larger dose, or use it because you enjoy the relaxed sensation it gives you, you are abusing the medication. For Flexeril, recreational use puts you at risk of side effects and psychological dependency. 

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