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Alcohol Addiction

Intoxicated Drinkers Will Pay Premium for Just One More

Posted on August 15, 2015 in Alcohol Addiction

 

Intoxicated Drinkers Will Pay Premium for Just One MoreNew findings from a group of American researchers point toward a spike in alcohol cravings and the willingness to pay for alcohol access in intoxicated drinkers.

Alcohol cravings are strong urges for alcohol use that can potentially indicate the presence of alcohol use disorder (alcoholism and/or non-addicted alcohol abuse) in a person who habitually drinks in heavy or excessive amounts. In a study published in March 2015 in the journal Addiction, researchers from the University of Missouri sought to determine if alcohol cravings increase significantly in people under the influence of alcohol intoxication. These researchers also sought to determine if intoxicated consumers experience real-world changes in their demands for alcohol and their willingness to pay in order to keep drinking.

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Automated Care Helps Alcoholics Maintain Sobriety

Posted on April 13, 2015 in Alcohol Addiction

Automated Care Helps Alcoholics Maintain SobrietyAlcohol treatment programs can use a form of psychotherapy called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help people recovering from alcoholism establish drinking abstinence or substantially reduce their alcohol intake. However, individuals who initially benefit from CBT often eventually return to excessive drinking. In a study published in October 2014 in the journal Addictive Behaviors, researchers from the University of Vermont assessed the potential effectiveness of a phone-based automated system, called Alcohol Therapeutic Interactive Voice Response (ATIVR), in helping to extend the treatment benefits of cognitive behavioral therapy. These researchers concluded that ATIVR may help people who have successfully established alcohol abstinence by the end of active therapy involvement.

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The 100-Day Hangover

Posted on October 13, 2014 in Alcohol Addiction

The 100-Day HangoverTony O’Neill thought he understood everything he needed to know about how long drugs stayed in his system: continuing on with methadone treatment while cheekily taking heroin over the weekend, he knew how to fool a urine test—three to five days and the drugs were gone. That was until he quit altogether, and six months later he still felt like he was suffering the effects of withdrawal. He felt “not quite himself,” depressed, irritable and apathetic. So, what was happening? He addresses this issue in an article published in The Fix, drawing on different viewpoints and pieces of research in order to get to the bottom of the process of withdrawal. Although most of us feel like we understand it, the notion of a 100-day hangover initially seems laughable. The problem is that this is a concise way of explaining what beating addiction really feels like. 

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Study Examines Impact of Alcohol on Associative Learning in Veterans

Posted on October 9, 2014 in Alcohol Addiction

Study Examines Impact of Alcohol on Associative Learning in VeteransVeterans returning from a deployment often experience difficulties in reentering normal daily life. Those exposed to any kind of tragic event while deployed may suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This disorder can be diagnosed based on a variety of symptoms, but common characteristics include flashbacks, insomnia and symptoms of depression and anxiety.

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Acamprosate, Naltrexone Help Alcoholics Stay Sober

Posted on August 25, 2014 in Alcohol Addiction

Acamprosate, Naltrexone Help Alcoholics Stay SoberAlcoholism has been treated for decades with counseling and support groups. These treatment measures have helped a great number of people, but for many, they just aren’t enough. Some alcoholics keep going back to drinking and spend decades battling the illness. Researchers have developed several medications that are approved for treating alcoholism and other addictions. Studies have shown that they can help alcoholics quit drinking when combined with support and therapy. Acamprosate and naltrexone have been the most effective for patients.  Nalmefene and topiramate are two other drugs that are useful for some patients. 

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Heavy Drinkers More Sensitive to Alcohol Have Increased for Alcoholism

Posted on August 14, 2014 in Alcohol Addiction

Binge drinking is the term used to describe the act of getting legally intoxicated in a single, relatively short bout of alcohol consumption. Most binge drinkers do not experience the physical dependence on alcohol that more or less defines the presence of alcoholism. However, some people who engage in this practice do eventually become alcoholics or develop diagnosable symptoms of alcohol abuse. In a study published in May 2014 in the journal Biological Psychiatry, researchers from three U.S. universities investigated the impact that a binge drinker’s reaction to alcohol has on his or her chances of developing a diagnosable case of alcohol use disorder (alcoholism and/or alcohol abuse).

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The Phenomenon of the Dry Drunk

Posted on July 31, 2014 in Alcohol Addiction

A dry drunk sounds like a contradictory term and, in many ways, it is. Psychologists and addiction experts define dry drunk as a person who has overcome alcoholism, but retains many of the negative thoughts, feelings and behaviors she had when she was drinking. In other words, the alcohol is gone, but the symptoms are still there. The same phenomenon can occur with a drug addict, but the term dry drunk is still used. If you have a dry drunk in your life, you must encourage her to continue with her treatment for addiction.

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Powdered Alcohol May Make Consumption Dangerously Easy

Posted on July 18, 2014 in Alcohol Addiction

Powdered Alcohol May Make Consumption Dangerously EasyThe combination of caffeine and alcohol has been a popular choice on college campuses in the last decade. The interaction of the two substances proved dangerous, with many students finding that they drank more when caffeine was part of the mix.

Now a new form of alcohol may lead to increased alcohol consumption. An article published in Medical Daily discusses the introduction of powdered alcohol. Mimicking the convenience of soft drink mixes that come in a packet for stirring into a water bottle, the substance could make drinking alcohol much too convenient. 

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Few Alcoholics Get Meds to Treat Addiction

Posted on July 15, 2014 in Alcohol Addiction

Few Alcoholics Get Meds to Treat AddictionFor decades, alcoholics have largely been treated through 12-step programs and support groups. While these still play an important role in recovery, more modern treatment advances, including medications, are not being fully utilized. Research tells us that addiction is a chronic medical condition, yet very few addicts get quality treatment when compared to other chronic illnesses. The medications naltrexone and acamprosate have been proven to help addicts get clean, yet only 10 percent take them. If we can make changes in how alcoholics get care, more people will be able to get sober and stay sober. 

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Studies Target Links Between Alcoholism and Depression

Posted on June 20, 2014 in Alcohol Addiction

Studies Target Links Between Alcoholism and DepressionAlcohol addiction is a devastating condition. Abuse of alcohol can wreck a person’s physical health, their career, and their important life relationships. Sadly, substance abuse rarely shows up in isolation. Many times addiction is accompanied by a co-occurring mental health condition. This is called comorbidity. A good deal of the time what shows up with alcohol addiction is depression.

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